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in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the count h moved dramically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american nsulate in benghazi, libya. four amerins we killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat se
conclude with a look at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real reforms. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthodox and trawl orthodox and those who are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beli
a situation in israel which hundreds of thousands of israelis do not have a personal status in the country. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains fragmented and in some cases disorganized but as the violence escalates, the international community may have to decide when and how to intervene am joining me cbs news correspondent clarissa ward. she has spent much of the past year reporting from inside sirria. she is one of the only journalists to tell this stor
to, or is it about what he has said or what they believe he may believe about israel and iran? >> my sense is that it's mostly about israel and iran and that they believe that as secretary of defense who says the kinds of things he says, not so much -- not exclusively the policy positions. but one of the reasons people have liked chuck hagel over the years, a lot of reasons reporters like him and his supporters like him is he's a pretty free-speaking guy. he's iconoclastic. he's willing to say things and think about things that is outside not just party orthodoxy but outside what the mainstream foreign policy establishment thinks and that for a lot of republicans to do that on israel, to do that on iran, for someone who's going to be running the pentagon i think they find that alarming. and there's other things. they resent him because he said nice things about the president. they resent him because he endorsed bob kerrey for senate. >> rose: and was against the iraq war. >> there's all those issues. >> rose: did the president have any choice after he floated the name because of what
's relation with israel and jordan's relation with israel and turkey's relation with israel and you see populism and the willing tons pray play that is problematic for israel's perspective. >> rose: risk six is europe muddling through. >> muddling through and a much lower risk in europe than last year. >> rose: gdp growth less than one, two percent. >> yes but not falling apart. >> rose: okay. and euro stone remains euro zone remains stable? >> absolutely .. >> rose: east asia politics, what is that. >> east asia politics. >> rose: is that indonesia? >> basically it is the entire -- you think about the pivot, one of the most important policies we put in place the last few years is largely because across the asian continent, you have countries that are increasingly integrating economically towards a very strong china, but they maintain much stronger political and security relations with the united states. >> rose: which countries are we talkable about? >> we are talking a. >> talking about japan but also talking about vietnam, korea, thailand, even myanmar. >> rose: even burma. >> even b
community from ethiopia yah to israel. it was an achievement not of myself only, it was a collective achievement of the state of israel but i had a part in it and i am proud of it. >> my dad had been the guy that dropped out of high school, joined the army, was fighting pancho via and i went to night school at night, went to law school at night, the whole bit. he wanted me to be a lawyer. so i said well, we owe $2,000, when i get out i'll owe $2,000, so i said let me get a job. so i got a job, my coach at brown was a coach at brown, took the job at penn state, so i went down there with him, i was going to go two years. i got caught up in coaching. i called up and i said dad, i'm gonna coach. you're gonna coach? what did you go to college for? >> rose: (laughs) >> and i said well i think i can do a good job. he said well you make sure you have an impact. he said don't waste your time. >> rose: how long were you ace sis tonight to rick? >> 16 years. >> rose: 16 years? >> yup. i had started to work at penn state before i even graduated brown. in those days we used to have two weeks of r
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)